Thursday, 20 January, 2022

Tensions between the executive and the social partners on the training of workers without a diploma


The social partners, mainly the CFDT, criticize the public authorities for having dropped their CléA certification for basic skills. The Ministry of Labor denies it.

Launched at the end of 2015, the CléA certification enables non-qualified workers to obtain certification guaranteeing a base of basic skills.

“The social partners […] unfortunately note that the policy of universal access to basic skills has been divested by the public authorities. “ Even if the criticism did not make much noise, unions and employers did not go dead hand, a few days ago, by pointing bluntly at the responsibility of the government, of the Ministry of Labor specifically, on a sensitive subject: the recognition of the skills of the active, salaried or unemployed, without a diploma.

The object of the position paper concerns CléA, a device that is somewhat unique in the world of continuing education. Designed entirely by unions and employers at the inter-professional level and therefore recognized nationally, this system gives access, after prior assessment and training in five years maximum, to a base of basic knowledge – writing, calculation, digital … – enshrined in the certification eponym.

More than 44,000 certifications

Launched in November 2015, CléA has been issued more than 44,000 times, often allowing those who have gone through to take a competition or change jobs. Alas, for the social partners – the CFDT mainly because it is she who runs the shop – the account is not there, or no longer. As evidenced by the drop in the number of candidates since 2019, the Covid crisis has not helped, despite a certain upturn at the end of last year.

Philippe Debruyne, confederal secretary of the union in charge of vocational training, points to the 2018 reform of Pénicaud which cut funding. “We had to fight to recreate the levers that the law has slashed”, he said during a press briefing. According to him, the public authorities have relied too much on the CPF application, even though the target audiences are not comfortable with digital technology.

The Ministry of Labor has not, he adds, translated into facts a number of advances that could have given CléA a boost, such as the one that makes it eligible for the Pro- AT. Consequently, the financial model which makes it possible to finance certifications is threatened. “If the state gives up, then we cannot be more royalist than the king”, did he declare.

Too complex?

Surprised by this questioning, the entourage of the Minister of Labor, Elisabeth Borne, denies any disinterest of the State in CléA, the proof being, for example, that the device can be financed via the regional variations of the plan of investment in skills. The objective, on the contrary, is to move up a gear by looking closely at the proposals of the social partners.

Some specialists return the ball to the court of the social partners themselves, for not having sufficiently promoted CléA: it is they, after all, who are in charge of the professional branches or operators of Opco skills, they point out. Others also highlight the complexity of the device, which Philippe Debruyne refutes.

The social partners, mainly the CFDT, criticize the public authorities for having dropped their CléA certification for basic skills. The Ministry of Labor denies it.

Launched at the end of 2015, the CléA certification enables non-qualified workers to obtain certification guaranteeing a base of basic skills.

“The social partners […] unfortunately note that the policy of universal access to basic skills has been divested by the public authorities. “ Even if the criticism did not make much noise, unions and employers did not go dead hand, a few days ago, by pointing bluntly at the responsibility of the government, of the Ministry of Labor specifically, on a sensitive subject: the recognition of the skills of the active, salaried or unemployed, without a diploma.

The object of the position paper concerns CléA, a device that is somewhat unique in the world of continuing education. Designed entirely by unions and employers at the inter-professional level and therefore recognized nationally, this system gives access, after prior assessment and training in five years maximum, to a base of basic knowledge – writing, calculation, digital … – enshrined in the certification eponym.

More than 44,000 certifications

Launched in November 2015, CléA has been issued more than 44,000 times, often allowing those who have gone through to take a competition or change jobs. Alas, for the social partners – the CFDT mainly because it is she who runs the shop – the account is not there, or no longer. As evidenced by the drop in the number of candidates since 2019, the Covid crisis has not helped, despite a certain upturn at the end of last year.

Philippe Debruyne, confederal secretary of the union in charge of vocational training, points to the 2018 reform of Pénicaud which cut funding. “We had to fight to recreate the levers that the law has slashed”, he said during a press briefing. According to him, the public authorities have relied too much on the CPF application, even though the target audiences are not comfortable with digital technology.

The Ministry of Labor has not, he adds, translated into facts a number of advances that could have given CléA a boost, such as the one that makes it eligible for the Pro- AT. Consequently, the financial model which makes it possible to finance certifications is threatened. “If the state gives up, then we cannot be more royalist than the king”, did he declare.

Too complex?

Surprised by this questioning, the entourage of the Minister of Labor, Elisabeth Borne, denies any disinterest of the State in CléA, the proof being, for example, that the device can be financed via the regional variations of the plan of investment in skills. The objective, on the contrary, is to move up a gear by looking closely at the proposals of the social partners.

Some specialists return the ball to the court of the social partners themselves, for not having sufficiently promoted CléA: it is they, after all, who are in charge of the professional branches or operators of Opco skills, they point out. Others also highlight the complexity of the device, which Philippe Debruyne refutes.