Friday, 03 December, 2021

Telework: unions and employers prove to the executive their ability to get along


After a final negotiating session this Thursday morning, an agreement on teleworking was found between the employers and four unions out of five, the CFDT, FO, the CFE-CGC and the CFTC. “Neither prescriptive nor prescriptive”, as the employers wished, it is intended to be a form of very operational code of conduct.

The employers' and union leaders in mid-July, at the exit of Matignon.

Four union signatures out of five… It was far from being won in advance but at the end of three weeks of negotiations and four days of intense negotiations, the teleworking negotiations started on November 3 ended with an agreement after a final 3-hour meeting on Thursday.

The employers’ fifth draft text received a “favorable opinion” from the CFDT, Force Ouvrière, CFE-CGC and CFTC, who formally have until December 23 to sign it. The CGT delegation has already warned that its organization will not initial it.

Read also:

DOSSIER> Telecommuting: what will change

Intense negotiations

After a sluggish start, trading picked up this week. Monday was to be the last meeting, but the social partners played extra time twice, Tuesday and Thursday mornings with intense negotiations between the two.

Starting from a text often listing the possibilities open to employers, employers and unions resulted in a document which meets the imperative of being “neither normative nor prescriptive” set from the start of negotiations by the representatives. employers.

Code of conduct

However, the agreement is not satisfied with being a simple catalog of measures from which the employer can draw. The end result would rather resemble a form of code of good conduct or a vade-mecum intended for employers and employees. While it does not impose new legal obligations on employers except at the very margins, the text, in its seven chapters, covers an extremely wide field, ranging from the question of setting up telework to maintaining contact. remotely from staff representatives to employees.

Read also:

Telework agreement: concrete progress for employees

If the subject of the negotiation was in itself important given the change in dimension taken by teleworking with the Covid epidemic, its stake went far beyond it. Faced with an executive at least doubtful about the effectiveness of social dialogue, a failure would have demonstrated a form of inability of employers and unions to take up important issues. If the head of the employers’ delegation, Hubert Mongon, general delegate of the Federation of metallurgy, welcomed that the two parties have ” met the expectations of companies and employees ”, he also pointed out that this ” show [leurs] capacity [s] to be able to meet the expectations of our country ”.

FO satisfied

He also stated to be “Personally, very happy to note that we have found an agreement which will bring together a very large majority of representative trade unions”. It must be said that the business leader will have wet his shirt, including in his own camp, to succeed in wresting room for maneuver to achieve such a result.

The general secretary of Force Ouvrière, Yves Veyrier, recalling that since the beginning of 2019 he had been calling for a negotiation on teleworking, also showed particular satisfaction at the end of the meeting of his confederal office which endorsed the signature of his organization. “FO was really in the maneuver until the end, especially on the issue of union rights” compared to teleworkers, the last concession made by employers to wrest the agreement.

“Millions of workers are now involved in teleworking. This agreement gives it a framework and rules ”, welcomed Laurent Berger, secretary general of the CFDT, on Twitter. “It’s up to us to bring them to life in each company thanks to social dialogue”, he added.

Read also:

Covid: teleworking should remain mandatory several days a week from January

After a final negotiating session this Thursday morning, an agreement on teleworking was found between the employers and four unions out of five, the CFDT, FO, the CFE-CGC and the CFTC. “Neither prescriptive nor prescriptive”, as the employers wished, it is intended to be a form of very operational code of conduct.

The employers' and union leaders in mid-July, at the exit of Matignon.

Four union signatures out of five… It was far from being won in advance but at the end of three weeks of negotiations and four days of intense negotiations, the teleworking negotiations started on November 3 ended with an agreement after a final 3-hour meeting on Thursday.

The employers’ fifth draft text received a “favorable opinion” from the CFDT, Force Ouvrière, CFE-CGC and CFTC, who formally have until December 23 to sign it. The CGT delegation has already warned that its organization will not initial it.

Read also:

DOSSIER> Telecommuting: what will change

Intense negotiations

After a sluggish start, trading picked up this week. Monday was to be the last meeting, but the social partners played extra time twice, Tuesday and Thursday mornings with intense negotiations between the two.

Starting from a text often listing the possibilities open to employers, employers and unions resulted in a document which meets the imperative of being “neither normative nor prescriptive” set from the start of negotiations by the representatives. employers.

Code of conduct

However, the agreement is not satisfied with being a simple catalog of measures from which the employer can draw. The end result would rather resemble a form of code of good conduct or a vade-mecum intended for employers and employees. While it does not impose new legal obligations on employers except at the very margins, the text, in its seven chapters, covers an extremely wide field, ranging from the question of setting up telework to maintaining contact. remotely from staff representatives to employees.

Read also:

Telework agreement: concrete progress for employees

If the subject of the negotiation was in itself important given the change in dimension taken by teleworking with the Covid epidemic, its stake went far beyond it. Faced with an executive at least doubtful about the effectiveness of social dialogue, a failure would have demonstrated a form of inability of employers and unions to take up important issues. If the head of the employers’ delegation, Hubert Mongon, general delegate of the Federation of metallurgy, welcomed that the two parties have ” met the expectations of companies and employees ”, he also pointed out that this ” show [leurs] capacity [s] to be able to meet the expectations of our country ”.

FO satisfied

He also stated to be “Personally, very happy to note that we have found an agreement which will bring together a very large majority of representative trade unions”. It must be said that the business leader will have wet his shirt, including in his own camp, to succeed in wresting room for maneuver to achieve such a result.

The general secretary of Force Ouvrière, Yves Veyrier, recalling that since the beginning of 2019 he had been calling for a negotiation on teleworking, also showed particular satisfaction at the end of the meeting of his confederal office which endorsed the signature of his organization. “FO was really in the maneuver until the end, especially on the issue of union rights” compared to teleworkers, the last concession made by employers to wrest the agreement.

“Millions of workers are now involved in teleworking. This agreement gives it a framework and rules ”, welcomed Laurent Berger, secretary general of the CFDT, on Twitter. “It’s up to us to bring them to life in each company thanks to social dialogue”, he added.

Read also:

Covid: teleworking should remain mandatory several days a week from January