Tuesday, 30 November, 2021

Taxes: the tax authorities will be able to use taxpayer data on social networks


The tax administration has just received the last green light to experiment for three years with the collection of personal data from taxpayers via social networks and online platforms.

In the days or weeks to come, the risk analysis algorithm of the General Directorate of Public Finances will be fed by social networks and online platforms.

Johnny Hallyday betrayed by Instagram. A few years ago, the judicial soap opera around the singer’s legacy showed that social networks can help determine the tax residence of a taxpayer. The sites and platforms on which users publish personal information can indeed constitute a valuable tool in the hunt for fraudulent tax domiciliations, illicit trafficking or other hidden activities. This has obviously not escaped the tax authorities who, however, do not use this possibility. But that will change soon.

The tax authorities have indeed just received the last buffering opening the way to experimentation, for three years, with the collection and use of public data (those that do not require entering a password) placed on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, etc., or on sites such as Airbnb, Leboncoin or other Blablacar. The decree detailing the modalities of implementation of this device has just been published, accompanied by new comments from the National Commission for Informatics and Freedoms (CNIL).

The tax administration has just received the last green light to experiment for three years with the collection of personal data from taxpayers via social networks and online platforms.

In the days or weeks to come, the risk analysis algorithm of the General Directorate of Public Finances will be fed by social networks and online platforms.

Johnny Hallyday betrayed by Instagram. A few years ago, the judicial soap opera around the singer’s legacy showed that social networks can help determine the tax residence of a taxpayer. The sites and platforms on which users publish personal information can indeed constitute a valuable tool in the hunt for fraudulent tax domiciliations, illicit trafficking or other hidden activities. This has obviously not escaped the tax authorities who, however, do not use this possibility. But that will change soon.

The tax authorities have indeed just received the last buffering opening the way to experimentation, for three years, with the collection and use of public data (those that do not require entering a password) placed on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, etc., or on sites such as Airbnb, Leboncoin or other Blablacar. The decree detailing the modalities of implementation of this device has just been published, accompanied by new comments from the National Commission for Informatics and Freedoms (CNIL).