Thursday, 13 January, 2022

Covid: France among the strictest countries during the first containment


France is among the countries that have adopted the toughest rules to face the first wave of the epidemic, combining a ban on leaving home and closing non-essential schools and businesses, according to an OECD study. On the other hand, it did not make the mask compulsory in public spaces during deconfinement.

On the Place de la Concorde in Paris in March 2020.

With the second wave, confinements bloomed again in Europe. In France since October 30, it is a “flexible” device, with open schools, as in the United Kingdom since November 5, but strong travel constraints. Elsewhere, in Germany, Italy and Spain, only certain areas are being confined, or more moderate traffic restrictions are being put in place (curfews, store opening hours, etc.).

Are some countries doing a little too much? It is the suspicion of a part of the opinion, which considers these unfair restrictions, in particular in France. Hence the interest of the comparative study carried out by the OECD on the confinements of the first wave, in its panorama of health, published this Thursday. It shows that the large countries most affected have adopted similar measures, and that France was one of the strictest – until deconfinement.

Read also:

DOSSIER> Covid: the epidemic figures and the health response in France

Of the 31 European countries studied, half (16) asked their citizens to stay at home during the first wave. These more or less flexible and more or less compulsory confinements lasted 47.5 days on average. The toughest were France and Italy with 55 days, Spain with 50 days and the UK with 46 days. The countries of northern and central Europe, little affected by the virus, were less directive. Germany (except in a few Länder), the Netherlands and Portugal have not opted for coercion either, while calling on their citizens to be cautious.

Almost all schools closed

All countries have closed businesses such as bars, restaurants and “non-essential” outlets for an average of 56 days, with the notable exception of Sweden. It is the only country in the world to have opted for a policy of collective immunity – protecting the weakest, but letting the rest of the population become infected and make antibodies. France, Italy and Spain have reopened businesses by deconfining. Among the unconfined, Germany closed them for 49 days, Finland for 74 days, Portugal for 51 days.

Read also:

What are the countries in Europe where the Covid has been the deadliest

Covid: how to make health systems more “resilient”

The restrictions have been very severe in education, since apart from Sweden and Iceland, all countries have closed their primary schools for an average of 68 days. There was not even an exception in secondary schools, with 69 days of closure on average. Primary schools in Spain and Italy did not reopen until the end of the school year. France was not far from it, with three months of closure (98 days).

Wearing a mask is often compulsory

It was not until March 17 that the European Union adopted a common policy of restricting non-essential travel with third countries. As for trade within the Union or the Schengen area, a third of the countries concerned (11 out of 31) decided to completely close their borders during the crisis.

Finally, the OECD looked at which countries have promoted the wearing of masks in public transport, shops, and other closed public spaces, when economies have deconfined, until July 3. The majority of them (18 out of 31) made it compulsory, including Germany, Italy, Spain. Only Iceland, Sweden and Norway did not issue a recommendation. In France, the use of the mask was then recommended only in the absence of a safety distance meter with its nearest neighbor, except in transport. In September, we had to change our minds. This attitude will undoubtedly not be put to the next deconfinement.

Read also:

The executive is preparing a reduction in containment by stages

DOSSIER> Reconfinement: what you need to know

France is among the countries that have adopted the toughest rules to face the first wave of the epidemic, combining a ban on leaving home and closing non-essential schools and businesses, according to an OECD study. On the other hand, it did not make the mask compulsory in public spaces during deconfinement.

On the Place de la Concorde in Paris in March 2020.

With the second wave, confinements bloomed again in Europe. In France since October 30, it is a “flexible” device, with open schools, as in the United Kingdom since November 5, but strong travel constraints. Elsewhere, in Germany, Italy and Spain, only certain areas are being confined, or more moderate traffic restrictions are being put in place (curfews, store opening hours, etc.).

Are some countries doing a little too much? It is the suspicion of a part of the opinion, which considers these unfair restrictions, in particular in France. Hence the interest of the comparative study carried out by the OECD on the confinements of the first wave, in its panorama of health, published this Thursday. It shows that the large countries most affected have adopted similar measures, and that France was one of the strictest – until deconfinement.

Read also:

DOSSIER> Covid: the epidemic figures and the health response in France

Of the 31 European countries studied, half (16) asked their citizens to stay at home during the first wave. These more or less flexible and more or less compulsory confinements lasted 47.5 days on average. The toughest were France and Italy with 55 days, Spain with 50 days and the UK with 46 days. The countries of northern and central Europe, little affected by the virus, were less directive. Germany (except in a few Länder), the Netherlands and Portugal have not opted for coercion either, while calling on their citizens to be cautious.

Almost all schools closed

All countries have closed businesses such as bars, restaurants and “non-essential” outlets for an average of 56 days, with the notable exception of Sweden. It is the only country in the world to have opted for a policy of collective immunity – protecting the weakest, but letting the rest of the population become infected and make antibodies. France, Italy and Spain have reopened businesses by deconfining. Among the unconfined, Germany closed them for 49 days, Finland for 74 days, Portugal for 51 days.

Read also:

What are the countries in Europe where the Covid has been the deadliest

Covid: how to make health systems more “resilient”

The restrictions have been very severe in education, since apart from Sweden and Iceland, all countries have closed their primary schools for an average of 68 days. There was not even an exception in secondary schools, with 69 days of closure on average. Primary schools in Spain and Italy did not reopen until the end of the school year. France was not far from it, with three months of closure (98 days).

Wearing a mask is often compulsory

It was not until March 17 that the European Union adopted a common policy of restricting non-essential travel with third countries. As for trade within the Union or the Schengen area, a third of the countries concerned (11 out of 31) decided to completely close their borders during the crisis.

Finally, the OECD looked at which countries have promoted the wearing of masks in public transport, shops, and other closed public spaces, when economies have deconfined, until July 3. The majority of them (18 out of 31) made it compulsory, including Germany, Italy, Spain. Only Iceland, Sweden and Norway did not issue a recommendation. In France, the use of the mask was then recommended only in the absence of a safety distance meter with its nearest neighbor, except in transport. In September, we had to change our minds. This attitude will undoubtedly not be put to the next deconfinement.

Read also:

The executive is preparing a reduction in containment by stages

DOSSIER> Reconfinement: what you need to know